Home Page | Global Trophic Cascades Program

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Global Trophic Cascades Program is a research and educational program with the purpose of investigating the role of predators in structuring ecological communities. This program puts special emphasis on the role of potential keystone species in top-down community regulation, with linkages to biodiversity via trophic cascades.

A graduate degree concentration is available as part of the Trophic Cascades Program. Designed for students interested in topics that intersect forestry and wildlife science, this concentration provides an interdisciplinary approach to attaining sustainability of both forest and wildlife resources. Available within the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, the forestry/wildlife degree concentration involves dynamic interaction with faculty in both the College of Forestry and the Department of Fisheries & Wildlife. For more information, go to Graduate Studies.


Participating Faculty/Scientists

  • William J. Ripple, Professor, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society; Director, Trophic Cascades Program.
    (More info...)
  • Robert L. Beschta, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Matthew G. Betts, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Julia C. Buck, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of California Santa Barbara.
    (More info...)
  • James A. Estes, Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz.
    (More info...)
  • Matt Hayward, School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor.
    (More info...)
  • Jan Kamler, Research Associate, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, University of Oxford.
    (More info...)
  • Graham Kerley, Centre for African Conservation Ecology
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  • Mike Letnic, Associate Professor, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences.
    (More info...)
  • David Macdonald, WildCRU, Professor, Zoology, University of Oxford.
    (More info...)
  • Taal Levi, Assitant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University.
    (More info...)
  • Michael P. Nelson, Professor, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Thomas Newsome, Postdoctoral Scholar.
    (More info...)
  • Luke Painter, Instructor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University.
    (More info...)
  • Arian Wallach, Charles Darwin University, School of Environment.
    (More info...)
  • Aaron Wirsing, Associate Professor, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington.
    (More info...)
The Lewis & Clark Project

Wildlife along the Lewis & Clark Trail: A GIS approach

The Lewis & Clark journals of the 1804-1806 expedition contain some of the earliest and most detailed written descriptions of a large part of the United States before Euro-American settlement. Using the daily entries in the journals, we have developed a spatial database, recording and mapping wildlife distribution and abundance, various ecological observations as well as encounters with the Native population. We concentrated on nine of the larger mammals, since the members of the Corps of Discovery kept detailed records of animals hunted and seen along the trail. One of the objectives was to examine the relationship between wildlife observations and proximity to human settlements. The results show considerable human influence on wildlife, even under relatively low human population densities.

Click on the interactive map below to find out which wildlife species Lewis & Clark encountered day by day on their historic journey.

Scientific Articles

Related news articles

The Journals of the Lews & Clark Expedition - the full text of the journals is online as published and edited by Gary Molton

Related research documenting changes in species distribution on a continental scale can be found in Laliberte and Ripple (2004) and on the range contraction website.


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