OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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Global Trophic Cascades Program is a research and educational program with the purpose of investigating the role of predators in structuring ecological communities. This program puts special emphasis on the role of potential keystone species in top-down community regulation, with linkages to biodiversity via trophic cascades.

A graduate degree concentration is available as part of the Trophic Cascades Program. Designed for students interested in topics that intersect forestry and wildlife science, this concentration provides an interdisciplinary approach to attaining sustainability of both forest and wildlife resources. Available within the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, the forestry/wildlife degree concentration involves dynamic interaction with faculty in both the College of Forestry and the Department of Fisheries & Wildlife. For more information, go to Graduate Studies.


Participating Faculty/Scientists

  • William J. Ripple, Professor, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society; Director, Trophic Cascades Program.
    (More info...)
  • Robert L. Beschta, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Matthew G. Betts, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Julia C. Buck, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of California Santa Barbara.
    (More info...)
  • James A. Estes, Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz.
    (More info...)
  • Matt Hayward, School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor.
    (More info...)
  • Jan Kamler, Research Associate, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, University of Oxford.
    (More info...)
  • Graham Kerley, Centre for African Conservation Ecology
    (More info...)
  • Mike Letnic, Associate Professor, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences.
    (More info...)
  • David Macdonald, WildCRU, Professor, Zoology, University of Oxford.
    (More info...)
  • Taal Levi, Assitant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University.
    (More info...)
  • Michael P. Nelson, Professor, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Thomas Newsome, Postdoctoral Scholar.
    (More info...)
  • Luke Painter, Instructor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University.
    (More info...)
  • Jonah Piovia-Scott, Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Vancouver.
    (More info...)
  • Arian Wallach, Charles Darwin University, School of Environment.
    (More info...)
  • Aaron Wirsing, Associate Professor, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington.
    (More info...)

The Aspen Project

Articles

Larsen, E.J. and Ripple, W.J. (2005). Aspen Stand Conditions on Elk Winter Ranges in the Northern Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA. Natural Areas Journal 25(4): 326-338.

Ripple, W.J. and Beschta, R.L. (2005). Linking Wolves and Plants: Aldo Leopold on Trophic Cascades. BioScience July 2005/Vol. 55 No. 7: 613-621 - Abstract

Ripple, W.J. and Beschta, R.L. (2005). Refugia from browsing as reference sites for restoration planning. Western North American Naturalist 65(2): 269-273.

Ripple, W.J. and Beschta, R.L. (2005).Willow thickets protect young aspen from elk browsing after wolf reintroduction. Western North American Naturalist 65(1): 118-122.

Ripple, William J. and Beschta, Robert L. (2004). Wolves and the Ecology of Fear: Can Predation Risk Structure Ecosystems? BioScience Augutst 2004/Vo.l 54 No. 8: 755-766.

Mystery in Yellowstone: wolves, wapiti, and the case of the disappearing aspen. Notable Notes, Oregon State University, 2004.

Bailey, J.K. and Whitham, T.G. (2003). Interactions among elk, aspen, galling sawflies and insectivorous birds. Oikos 101: 127-134.

Beschta, R.L. (2003). Cottonwoods, elk, and wolves in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park. Ecological Applications 13(5): 1295-1309.

Larsen, E.J. and W.J. Ripple. (2003). Aspen age structure in the northern Yellowstone Ecosystem:USA. Forest Ecology and Management. 179: 469-482.

Powell, D. Reintroduction of Wolves May End Tree and Shrub Decline in Yellowstone. The Forestry Source (December 2003). 

Ripple, W.J. and Beschta, R.L. (2003). Wolf reintroduction, predation risk, and cottonwood recovery in Yellowstone National Park. Forest Ecology and Management 184: 299-313.

Humans, wolves, elk, aspen and willow, and now beetles (HWEAW+B) science workshop proceedings, February 5 & 6, 2002, Banff, Alberta.

Kleintjes, P.K. and Fettig, S.A. Butterflies, elk and aspen: what’s the connection? Proceedings of the 6th Symposium of Biological Research in the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico, January 24th, 2002.

Ripple, W.J. and Larsen, E.J. (2001). The Role of Postfire Coarse Woody Debris in Aspen Regeneration. Western North American Naturalist 16(2): 61-64.

Ripple, W. J., E. J. Larsen, R. A. Renkin, D. W. Smith. (2001). Trophic Cascades among wolves, elk and aspen on Yellowstone National Park’s northern range. Biological Conservation. 102:227-234.

Ripple, W.J. and Larsen, E.J. (2000). Historic aspen recruitment, elk, and wolves in northern Yellowstone National Park, USA. Biological Conservation 95: 361-370.

Larsen, E.J. and W.J. Ripple. Remote Sensing of Aspen Change in Northern Yellowstone National Park. Unpublished manuscript, 1997.

 

Home Page | Global Trophic Cascades Program
OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

Home Page

Global Trophic Cascades Program is a research and educational program with the purpose of investigating the role of predators in structuring ecological communities. This program puts special emphasis on the role of potential keystone species in top-down community regulation, with linkages to biodiversity via trophic cascades.

A graduate degree concentration is available as part of the Trophic Cascades Program. Designed for students interested in topics that intersect forestry and wildlife science, this concentration provides an interdisciplinary approach to attaining sustainability of both forest and wildlife resources. Available within the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society, the forestry/wildlife degree concentration involves dynamic interaction with faculty in both the College of Forestry and the Department of Fisheries & Wildlife. For more information, go to Graduate Studies.


Participating Faculty/Scientists

  • William J. Ripple, Professor, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society; Director, Trophic Cascades Program.
    (More info...)
  • Robert L. Beschta, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Matthew G. Betts, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Julia C. Buck, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, University of California Santa Barbara.
    (More info...)
  • James A. Estes, Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz.
    (More info...)
  • Matt Hayward, School of Environment, Natural Resources and Geography, Bangor.
    (More info...)
  • Jan Kamler, Research Associate, Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, University of Oxford.
    (More info...)
  • Graham Kerley, Centre for African Conservation Ecology
    (More info...)
  • Mike Letnic, Associate Professor, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences.
    (More info...)
  • David Macdonald, WildCRU, Professor, Zoology, University of Oxford.
    (More info...)
  • Taal Levi, Assitant Professor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University.
    (More info...)
  • Michael P. Nelson, Professor, Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society.
    (More info...)
  • Thomas Newsome, Postdoctoral Scholar.
    (More info...)
  • Luke Painter, Instructor, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University.
    (More info...)
  • Jonah Piovia-Scott, Assistant Professor, School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University, Vancouver.
    (More info...)
  • Arian Wallach, Charles Darwin University, School of Environment.
    (More info...)
  • Aaron Wirsing, Associate Professor, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, University of Washington.
    (More info...)